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16

Jun

Nothing soothes you.

I have tried the incense sticks,
the Chamomile lotion,
the jasmine tea, the silence.

There is nothing to be done for you.
I am ready to forgive myself for that.

I am ready to stop viewing your
sadness as a failing on my part.

Donna-Marie Riley, Go Gently About Your Love (via five—a—day)

27

Jan

(Source: bootysinn)

staff:


Tumblr Tuesday: Civil Rights and Equality Edition
Black Girls Talking Official Tumblr of the pop culture podcast featuring four black girls talking. Hitting play feels like you’ve crashed the slumber party of four super smart women who care.
Gradient Lair For and about black women in media. Featuring a stand-out womanist-perspective essay on the surprise Beyoncé album.
Why Be Socially Responsible? “Social responsibility?” you ask. “What’s in it for me?” you ask. Stop asking questions and start fulfilling your obligation to humanity. We are all connected, ya bozo. 
Kid President Kid President’s rules are all golden: “Before you say something about the barbecue sauce on somebody else’s shirt—you should take a look at the barbecue sauce on your own shirt.”
Photo by Blake Bolinger

staff:

Tumblr Tuesday: Civil Rights and Equality Edition

Black Girls Talking
Official Tumblr of the pop culture podcast featuring four black girls talking. Hitting play feels like you’ve crashed the slumber party of four super smart women who care.

Gradient Lair
For and about black women in media. Featuring a stand-out womanist-perspective essay on the surprise Beyoncé album.

Why Be Socially Responsible?
“Social responsibility?” you ask. “What’s in it for me?” you ask. Stop asking questions and start fulfilling your obligation to humanity. We are all connected, ya bozo. 

Kid President
Kid President’s rules are all golden: “Before you say something about the barbecue sauce on somebody else’s shirt—you should take a look at the barbecue sauce on your own shirt.”

Photo by Blake Bolinger

five—a—day:

Exhibit X

I learned in school that war is what happens 
when nations disagree, but the textbooks never told me 
that war is also what happens when parents disagree, 

and when children throw insults harder than they hit baseballs
and when I cannot force myself out of bed in the morning 
because there is a voice in my head that tells me 
I might win the battle, but I will not win the —

War is what happens when teachers call on students
who don’t have the answers and they are left 
fighting their father once he sees their report card. 
War is what happens when it rains so hard 
blades of grass bend over defeated. 
War is what happens over telephone wires when a son 
tells his mother he is gay and her white flag 
of surrender is the phone going dead.

I have seen war burst into being the moment girls think 
they’re too old to hold hands and again some years later when 
they’re too young to do more than that, but charge forwards regardless
only to end up with semen exploding inside them like shrapnel.

I have seen war across some people’s wrists.
I have seen it in bones trying to revolt from the flesh.
I have seen it in eyes like double whiskey shots
that are drunk off self-hatred.

I was taught that war was loud. It was supposed to be
bombs and a dictator’s speech and the sound of an entire race 
being crossed off one by one, like the days of a calendar.
And I can agree that this is war, but war can also be quiet.

War can be as quiet as a miscarriage.
Or the therapy sessions afterwards, which is quieter even.

It can be as silent as a gas leak.

They asked me in sixth grade what war meant to me
and I told them about the Holocaust, I told them about the Jews.
I didn’t tell them about the boy across the road from me
whose father used his forearms as ashtrays and whose eyes
were the American flag: star-spangled.

I didn’t tell them about women that have their bodies claimed 
like new worlds, or men who punch walls and wear their bruised knuckles
like honour badges for all the tears they haven’t cried because 

they were raised to be soldiers and soldiers do not cry.

I didn’t mention any of these things because I was taught 
that war was big. It was something that happened between countries 
and it happened with armies and guns and nuclear weapons.

But if they asked me now—if they asked me now
what war meant to me, I would tell them that war is what happens 
inside people, and I would show them this poem as my evidence.

——-

Re-blogging because recent comments on it have helped me feel like a decent writer again. Thank you. <3

14

Jan

I am still in the habit of doing things I do not wish to do, remaining friends with people I’ve long since outgrown, and putting the happiness and comfort of other people before my own. What I have learned most from this compulsion (which I do not think is too strong of a word to use), is that I am always the one with the lower hand. Again and again, I am the one wasting time, enduring crippling anxiety, swallowing tension, all to save other people from getting their feelings hurt. And I am doing it to myself. My inability to say no is ruining me. But I don’t want to keep hurting myself this way. I have given up too many forms of self-harm not to recognize this as one in its own right. It’s time to start being honest. It’s time to stop giving in when I run out of excuses. It’s time to stop forcing the laughter with the crowbar of my tongue. It’s time to stop indulging others at the expense of my own well-being. This will be the year of saying, I’m sorry, but we have nothing left in common. I’m sorry, but I would rather stay in bed. Rather save my money. Rather stay out of the cold. I’m sorry, but I just don’t want to. This will be the year of putting myself first. The year of letting go. The year of freedom.
Donna-Marie Riley (via five—a—day)

17

Oct

i8ent:

I’ve done this in deep thought…..lol

i8ent:

I’ve done this in deep thought…..lol

i8ent:

and-the-distance:

1970 Buick Skylark





I love it….GM or die

Gm or die

i8ent:

and-the-distance:

1970 Buick Skylark

I love it….GM or die

Gm or die

27

Sep

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: 50 Chicken Dinner Recipes from Food Network Magazine http://bit.ly/18GNQgM.

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: 50 Chicken Dinner Recipes from Food Network Magazine http://bit.ly/18GNQgM.

24

Sep

The majority of workers waste their time on Tumblr, followed by Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and SnapChat.

Forbes: 64% of employees wasting time at work

Num! Ber! One!
Num! Ber! One!

(via staff)

10

Sep

theurbanvanity:

PLEASE REBLOG! Alexis was last seen wearing a pink blouse, floral print (full length) spandex pants, and brown boots and was carrying a dark and light-colored grey purse. She was traveling in a white 2003 Nissan Maxima GLE SE, license plates: WYN-3706, which was located on August 6th, 2013, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Alexis was last seen at approximately 7:15 p.m. on August 3, 2013, in Lovingston, Virgina. She was traveling in the above-mentioned vehicle wearing the clothes incidcated. Alexis Murphy’s car was found unattended in the old Carmike Cinema parking lot just outside of the Charlottesville city limits on Tuesday, August 6, 2013. Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of Alexis Tiara Murphy should contact the Nelson County Sherriff’s office at (434) 263-7050.

theurbanvanity:

PLEASE REBLOG! Alexis was last seen wearing a pink blouse, floral print (full length) spandex pants, and brown boots and was carrying a dark and light-colored grey purse. She was traveling in a white 2003 Nissan Maxima GLE SE, license plates: WYN-3706, which was located on August 6th, 2013, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Alexis was last seen at approximately 7:15 p.m. on August 3, 2013, in Lovingston, Virgina. She was traveling in the above-mentioned vehicle wearing the clothes incidcated. Alexis Murphy’s car was found unattended in the old Carmike Cinema parking lot just outside of the Charlottesville city limits on Tuesday, August 6, 2013. Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of Alexis Tiara Murphy should contact the Nelson County Sherriff’s office at (434) 263-7050.